Terrain Tips and Exhibit Ideas

Hello everyone! 👋

With the release of patch 1.8, jurassic world evolution has gotten quite the upgrade in terrain tools that allowed many players to make some of the coolest and unique exhibits for our parks and dinosaurs. I think we should start having a dedicated thread here to showcase what is capable with the new terrain tools and if there are any tips and ideas we could use for our next park. I have some ideas ready but I would love to see what you all could do, it's time to get inspired!

• Use the rock tool to emulate deeper water
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One of my favorite tips is to simply use the rock tool to give an idea of how deep the water it. It could give the illusion of depths for our water based exhibits, perfect for our spinosaurus feeding areas. Likewise, the sand and mud tool could be used to outline the rock to give an idea of how shallow the water is before the sudden drop to the deep end of the body of water.

Use the rock tool to emphasise steep areas of the exhibit
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With the new terrain contour line options, you could see which areas are very steep when playing around with elevation. In those areas, try out the rock tool to give it a sense of added depth, and how it would be too steep for plant growth as the water would just flow downwards from the steep slope.

• The sand and bush tool could be used to create a savannah environment
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Some of the maps would allow for the use of the sand tool. Sand has an interesting reaction to the bush tool: Where other terrain options would get covered in the green bush, sand would cover the base green of the bush area but would still allow for plant matter to form. This has become a rather popular terrain option for African, South American, and savannah based exhibits. To add to the savannah look, place down small trees with some distance from each other to give it an arid look.

• Create dunes with the raise terrain tool and rocks
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First, play around with the terrain as you like for the desert based exhibits. When you feel like you have a good idea of what you like, start placing down some rock sparingly in your exhibit. Then raise the terrain around the rocky locations. What should happen is that the terrain would swallow the rocks you have placed. This is great to give off the idea of large sand dunes as they are not a permanent raise of land but large piles of sand being raised and lowered by the wind. A subtle tip would be to place trees by the fence next to forested areas or the oasis so that the dinosaurs could get their tree need filled without breaking the large desert visual.

• Use the bush tool downhill for hilly exhibits
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One idea I love to play with is the thought of water flow during exhibit design. I like the idea that in hilly exhibits, the water would trickle down from the hills and be stuck on the bottom. With no river to go to, the water would be stuck between the hills, allowing for larger vegetation to grown. This could work for large temperate grassy hills in your park.

• For rocky exhibits, treat the rock tool as a fence for your vegetation
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I like to make my rocky exhibits have a bit of vegetation to make it hospitable for our dinosaurs tree needs. So I would use the rock tool and create a near ring of sorts of rock to contain the vegetation of the exhibit.

• Use the big tree to hide tiny bodies of water
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This idea is mainly a means to play with perspective. To have the water be underneath the leaves of the tree, you could have a top down perspective where the entire exhibit is green, and then see the body of water when entering a gallery.

• Try to use the species of trees to set the time period of the exhibit
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With the 5 tree options we were given, you could play around with the tree's looks to illustrate the time of these dinosaurs. Currently our choices are limited between 2 palm based trees, and 3 leaf trees. It may not be scientifically accurate, but I like to play with the idea of tree species and number of trees to set the time period of these dinosaurs. When building an exhibit set in a cretaceous period and not in a tropical area, I would include more leaf based trees then palms. However, when building a jurassic exhibit, I would apply more palm based trees. Its experimental and may not be scientifically accurate, but it helps define my jurassic exhibits from the cretaceous exhibits.

So far these are the things I do when building exhibits. I hope they prove to be helpful to give ideas in exhibit building. I would love to see what you all could make and share your ideas so that others would be inspired for their future parks.
 
Great Idea. I have a few questions though:
1. What tips do you have when using the palm based trees?
2. What Shrub tool do you suggest I use in swampy areas?
3. What tips do you have with covering fences without breaking the natural essence and not have a man made feel?

Thats all my questions. For now atleast.🤣🤣🤣 Hope I get an answer.
 
Hey, sure thing.

For the palm based trees, I use them for beach and tropical areas. I also notice I use them to circle the open area I have in the middle of the parks. Here are some photos that might give you an idea. I use the big thick ones for my beach based exhibits, and the thin ones multiple times for my jungle exhibits.

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To make exhibits look natural, I would make the fence end with the outskirts of the map. Dinosaurs (mainly carnivores) bigger than a spinoraptor would not attempt to escape if you connect the fence like this. It will enclose the dinosaurs in and treat them as though they are in a circular fence when they have the rest of the island behind them.

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This works for cliffs and beaches too

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I also circulate the fencing with heavy forests, that way the dinosaurs look as though they have an endless jungle and wilds behind them instead of more paths and buildings. This is also great for hiding away major facilities and power stations.

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And for the wetlands, I like to use the grassland brush tool to give it a lilly pad look, and the coastal brush tool for a seaweed like environment in shallow waters.

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I hope this answers your question :)
 
Hey, sure thing.

For the palm based trees, I use them for beach and tropical areas. I also notice I use them to circle the open area I have in the middle of the parks. Here are some photos that might give you an idea. I use the big thick ones for my beach based exhibits, and the thin ones multiple times for my jungle exhibits.

View attachment 140269
View attachment 140260View attachment 140261View attachment 140262

To make exhibits look natural, I would make the fence end with the outskirts of the map. Dinosaurs (mainly carnivores) bigger than a spinoraptor would not attempt to escape if you connect the fence like this. It will enclose the dinosaurs in and treat them as though they are in a circular fence when they have the rest of the island behind them.

View attachment 140263
View attachment 140270

This works for cliffs and beaches too

View attachment 140266

I also circulate the fencing with heavy forests, that way the dinosaurs look as though they have an endless jungle and wilds behind them instead of more paths and buildings. This is also great for hiding away major facilities and power stations.

View attachment 140264View attachment 140265

And for the wetlands, I like to use the grassland brush tool to give it a lilly pad look, and the coastal brush tool for a seaweed like environment in shallow waters.

View attachment 140267

I hope this answers your question :)
Thanks very much. This will be a big help in making good looking enclosures. I usually use one tree type per enclosure cause I have trouble blending them together to look nice, especially the regular trees. Finally with a basis I'll have less trouble doing so. Soooo final question for now. Do you have any tips for blending the different tree types?

When I have any more questions regarding this topic, I'll just post it here (If that's Ok with you)
 
Hey it's no worries, everyone is free to post on this thread after all. I wish for it to be an opportunity to share exhibit designs, tips, and tricks between members on this website.

The trees given to us blends well with the game's environment, so you could do whatever you like. I would suggest experimenting for yourself and make some rules for designing these exhibits.

So I made a rule that if I would make a palm and leaf based exhibit, I would make the palms come closer to the water area and the leaf trees away from the watery area. That way it there is a transition to the trees. But ultimately, experiment and see what works, thats the best advice I could give you on the matter.
 
Hey it's no worries, everyone is free to post on this thread after all. I wish for it to be an opportunity to share exhibit designs, tips, and tricks between members on this website.

The trees given to us blends well with the game's environment, so you could do whatever you like. I would suggest experimenting for yourself and make some rules for designing these exhibits.

So I made a rule that if I would make a palm and leaf based exhibit, I would make the palms come closer to the water area and the leaf trees away from the watery area. That way it there is a transition to the trees. But ultimately, experiment and see what works, thats the best advice I could give you on the matter.
Thanks for the tip. I'll only get to play later but I'll keep that in mind🙂
 
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