General / Off-Topic Recycle or Die! (the elite environmental thread)

Most of their arable land isn't being utilized, and they have enough food already.
They could easily feed the world.
What on Earth are you talking about? Feed the world? That one takes the award Bob :D

Africa is the only part of the World having roughly the carbon footprint we all need to adapt. Imagine that. Do you know many people who would do that?

You could say that it's their problem, but read the Event article from earlier if you haven't. That indicates that someone has seen the light, and realized that you can't build a fortress, and they even had the CR to do it.

It is very difficult for us humans to care much about anyone outside our "tribe", family, friends and colleagues (who the beep invented the spelling of that word?). It's coded in our DNA.

Also we have a pretty lousy intuitive understanding of numbers. Close your eyes and imagine 5 apples. Then imagine 1000 or even worse a trillion.
 
I'll confess that I know nothing about phosphorus, a shortage of it or what remedies might be used to address such a shortage.
Don't worry. The best suggestion I've seen so far includes building an extra set of sewers to separate the urine where most of the phosphorus we eat ends up. Good luck convincing people that using human urine is a good fertilizer, and even better luck building an extra sewer when the one we already have doesn't work very well many places. Add to that, that it has to be up and running in a few decades. Not impossible, but it's currently not a big concern, even though:

"When considering acute future challenges, people do not often think about phosphorus. However, securing enough food for the world’s population is at least as important as the development of renewable energy and the reduction of greenhouse gases."
 
One would hope that 'Dust Bowl America' would teach humans, about the importance or crop rotation etc..
Reminded me of this terrific little article in the Guardian, from last week. Apologies if someone has already linked to it.


John Cherry bends down and takes a handful of soil in his hands, brings it up to his face and breathes deeply.

“You can smell when it is good,” he says, poking it with a finger. “This smells of roots … there is a rich, organic quality to it. It is a good smell.”

Cherry is one of a growing army of UK farmers who are turning their back on the plough – and centuries of farming tradition – in an effort to tackle a little-noticed but potentially devastating environmental crisis: the degradation of the Earth’s soil.

The UN has warned that soils around the world are heading for exhaustion and depletion, with an estimated 60 harvests left before they are too barren to feed the planet.
 
What on Earth are you talking about? Feed the world? That one takes the award Bob :D
They have roughly 60% of the world's uncultivated arable land, lol!

On the agribusiness front, with more than 60% of the world’s as yet uncultivated arable land, and with the pressure on global food production already ramping up enormously, Africa looks tremendously attractive, at least on paper.
and lots of food goes to waste, that's an infrastructure problem:

“Most exports of agricultural produce from Africa are unprocessed and, as the Nigerian minister of agriculture pointed out at a recent press conference, half the tomatoes produced in the country rot by the roadside,” Lashbrook observes. “Projects to cut back on waste and add value are desperately needed.”


If you haven’t been tracking developments in African agriculture lately—and unless you’re an economist or working for a nongovernmental organization or something, why would you?—then you may have missed the big news: For the first time in a half century, farming in Africa, particularly in the sub-Sahara, is booming.
Even infamously food-insecure Malawi and Ethiopia now grow enough to export surpluses to their neighbors. And the most densely populated western part of the continent has sustained such profound gains that Steven Wiggins, a leading expert on agriculture, has declared that “a green revolution is already under way.”


Africa is the only part of the World having roughly the carbon footprint we all need to adapt. Imagine that. Do you know many people who would do that?
None, including you.
That's been my point for this entire thread!
LOL!
You are just trying to pass off your ridiculous straw arguments!

I've said from the get go that this is a population problem.
Your dishonesty is tedious.


You could say that it's their problem, but read the Event article from earlier if you haven't. That indicates that someone has seen the light, and realized that you can't build a fortress, and they even had the CR to do it.

It is very difficult for us humans to care much about anyone outside our "tribe", family, friends and colleagues (who the beep invented the spelling of that word?). It's coded in our DNA.

Also we have a pretty lousy intuitive understanding of numbers. Close your eyes and imagine 5 apples. Then imagine 1000 or even worse a trillion.
You are still off in lala land.
It IS their problem, and it's largely socio-political, not weather related.
 
You need to understand that the World does not have very much uncultivated arable land left.

And LOL is not a strong argument ;)

It doesn't surprise me that you cannot discern the component parts of an argument, given your fallacious diversions in this thread.

600 million hectares of "uncultivated, arable" land in Africa alone is quite a lot!


You are almost as bad as Greg, lol!




"...science is more than a body of knowledge. It's a way of thinking. A way of skeptically interrogating the universe with a fine understanding of human fallibility."

Carl Sagan
 
It doesn't surprise me that you cannot discern the component parts of an argument, given your fallacious diversions in this thread.

600 million hectares of "uncultivated, arable" land in Africa alone is quite a lot!


You are almost as bad as Greg, lol!




"...science is more than a body of knowledge. It's a way of thinking. A way of skeptically interrogating the universe with a fine understanding of human fallibility."

Carl Sagan
It's Gregg, learn to write.
 
I know what it means and stand by the distinction.
It's called a typo, not a write-o.

I know how to write just fine.
https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/write

to form (characters, symbols, etc.) on a surface with an instrument (such as a pen)
In this particular case, the surface is my screen and the instrument is my keyboard. "Type" is a special case of "write". Also, I didn't say it was a "write-o" so you are shooting the strawman now.
 
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