[Information] The Galactic Mapping Project & Expedition Hub

But it's also wasting the admins' time. This is not a thread to post pretty pictures or things that people just think are cool - there's a Photography thread that already exists for that (here - https://forums.frontier.co.uk/threads/the-official-explorers-photography-thread.292988/ ). This is a thread for posting interesting sites, with unusual orbital configurations or actually rare features - something that people could go out of their way to see. Brown dwarfs with rings or stars that colour their planets purple or triple star systems are dime a dozen and are not worthy of that and shouldn't be submitted.

Maybe the submission instructions need to be refined or made more obvious or something, I don't know. But certainly since the page was restarted after the big exploration update it seems that people either aren't reading the existing ones or don't care.
What is “interesting” is purely down to an individual’s personal taste. I’ve posted a couple of finds of ammonia magma/geysers because the admin said they were rare & asked for them; I personally don’t find them in the slightest interesting. If this thread is for finding poi that are unusual, or attractive, and worthy of travelling great distances to see them, then more stringent criteria should have been given together with examples. However if a pilot (including total newcomers to the game, let alone long expeditions) has travelled 40kylies from the bubble then they’ve already travelled great distances, so why not let them decide.
 
interesting is subject to personal taste, but rare and unusual isn't. A double binary can be pretty and interesting, if the stars are in close to each other, but it's not rare or unusual. It should be about finding things that can amaze any commander, not just a newer player.
 
No surprises here. The rule of the thumb - "Would another explorer be willing to travel thousands of LYs to visit this place?" - is subjective, and something that players new to exploration can't quite answer well. (The recent activity comes from DW2, with lots of beginners on it.) On the other hand, the guideline "Candidate entries should be something unique or rare" brings up rarity, which at least can be measured.
But.
If you wish to go into making a more objective set of criteria, you'll most likely end up with several pages of them. Would that be worth it? Personally, I don't think so.

Besides, I don't think that posting something which isn't noteworthy is a big waste of curator time. It takes less than a minute to glance at a submission and determine if it might be notable or not. If it isn't, then it just gets marked as such and there's nothing more that needs to be done with it. What would instead be a waste of time would be, for example, posting a good find in a wrong format, with typos, and so on.

The question of past entries is a good one though. It isn't really fair to submitters if they see something that's already on the GMP, they post the same but their own that they found, but then get told that it isn't notable. In my opinion, there are entries on the GMP that could use some culling, because we thought they were rare, but over time learned that they aren't really. I have absolutely no idea how feasible it is to just delete entries though, plus removing entries could tread on some egos, so I'd just recommend making a new filter. Mark such stuff as Obsolete or something, and make note that no more of such entries will be added.
For example: bark mounds.
 
interesting is subject to personal taste, but rare and unusual isn't. A double binary can be pretty and interesting, if the stars are in close to each other, but it's not rare or unusual. It should be about finding things that can amaze any commander, not just a newer player.
Rare and unusual can be hard to gauge when you're a new player. There are things on my bucket list that I've never seen in 60k systems that people who've travelled half as widely already consider old hat because that's the way random works.

You can see something that's awesome and unlike anything you've seen before and it can feel rare because you've got one example in 2, 10 or 20 thousand systems but in the ~40 million we've seen collectively and recorded on EDSM it might be ten a penny. Even then that is such a tiny fraction of all the systems that we've not actually got a good objective assessment of rare or unusual for an awful lot of things.

Rare and unusual enough to get an entry on the GMP is the subjective decision of the curators.
 
Name:2 Distant Worlds
Game map search ref:PRO CHRUIA EZ-S D3-72
Description:Short and simple, binary pair of Earth-like worlds in the Bleak Lands. Not incredibly unique, but it's in between "Rendezvous Point" and "Luna's Shadow" so if you're going along that path it's worth stopping by.
Screenshot reference:
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Name:Frost Giant
Game map search ref:PRO CHRUIA MR-N D6-122
Description:Icy Body with a mass of 27 Earth's, and radius of 20,101 km. Not a record breaker, but it's quite the monster for being out in the middle of nowhere. It has 2 rings, a smaller rocky ring, and a larger icy ring with a radius of 108,001 km.
Screenshot reference:
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Name:Icarus
Game map search ref:PRO CHRUIA XJ-I D9-29
Description:This Class IV Gas Giant orbits its star in just 2.5 days. Yup, it whips around a star in 72 hours. Its rotational period is exactly twice that, at 5.0 days. It's orbit is rather eccentric, so at some points in its orbit it is significantly closer to the star. The pictures below are taken when it is about 11 ls from the star, and at closest approach it should be a few ls closer. The gas giant's proximity to its star gives it a blood red color.
Screenshot reference:
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I have the feeling in this thread that newcomers are not that respected. CMDRs are submitting systems or locations they think that they are worthy. And they think that because some of the existing POIs are of the same rarity.
I don't like how it's going on about people submitting their findings here. Respect the submissions. The admins of the project will tell them if it's worthy or not. You have no reason to criticize what's being posted here every time.
Didn't want to spark any discussion, all I meant with my statement was that newcomers don't really know what is rare, unusual etc. as they lack the experience. To get a better feeling for this, one can click on the EDSM map and see what POI's have already been submitted.
 
How common are orbital bodies within a ring gap, and is this worth a submission?
O7, commander :) We have a special thread for moons inside rings.

As for the rarity, well, it's a difficult question, actually. Unlike the real world, in ED shepherd moons are not something you find every day (or every week, even), unless you're specifically looking for them. On the other hand we have statistical calculations made by cmdr. Orvidius and it looks, that there are about 10K systems with shepherd moons in EDSM database. However some nice-looking bodies with large rings and moons inside them (like the Poseidon's Fury or Mors et Vitae) are GMP's POIs and I personally think they are totally worth it.
 
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Didn't want to spark any discussion, all I meant with my statement was that newcomers don't really know what is rare, unusual etc. as they lack the experience. To get a better feeling for this, one can click on the EDSM map and see what POI's have already been submitted.
But most of them are not rare anymore. That's exactly what I meant what happened to me. So you can't rely on the existing POIs anymore. Here are always some people that are not the admins that say "naahhhh, this is not rare", even if there are POIs like that. And that is what bothers me.
 
There's been some interesting debates on here over the past few days, with some good points raised in regards to downgrading or re-categorising some of the older POIs that were once interesting, but these days not so much. I think we will do this casually and possibly downgrade some of the older POIs and relabel them under the "Other POI" tag.

We are reluctant to delete entries that these days are not as interesting as some of the newer finds, the reason being is a lot of them (granted not all), were at some point interesting within the context of what the game offered during the time of their submission to the GMP. In addition, a lot of these now 'lesser' POIs were discovered by explorers that travelled the Galaxy during an era that may have predated all the mod-cons we have today (like massively increased jump ranges, star filters, 20K route plotters etc) and the 'work' they put in to travelling to and locating those once interesting systems and in helping to flesh out the maps in the early days will not be forgotten.

I'll discuss with the rest of the GMP team in regards to downgrading older / less interesting entries, so that they can be more easily filtered out of the search when using the map.
 
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I think we will do this casually and possibly downgrade some of the older POIs and relabel them under the "Other POI" tag.
I'd suggest using another category. The name "Other POIs" evokes that that's where entries which don't fit into any of the rest go, not ones that are no longer interesting. Plus players wouldn't know from the name alone that similar entries are no longer being added. So, how about "Archived POIs" instead?
 
Before you shout "NOOB!" and "BORING!", I've travelled over 1.1 mly, so I know that this system isn't "rare". However, looking at the location on the EDSM map, there's nothing like this for thousands of lys. So, I think it's interesting enough to make a good POI for the GMP.

Also, I really suck at naming. Please feel free to pick something else...anything else.

Name:Bowtie in the Sky (I suck at naming)
Game Map search ref:Plae Thaa NH-V d2-9
Description:At the heart of this system lies a binary Neutron and Class M pair in close orbit, switching places every 6 hours. This binary pair is orbited by small, landable planet just over 33 lightseconds from the epicenter. Landing on this small planet allows views of the blue and yellow pair above.

Though not particularly rare in itself, this system lies in a relatively barren part of the Perseus Arm known as Achilles Altar, making this stand out within the region.
Screenshot reference
 

Ozric

Volunteer Moderator
In addition, a lot of these now 'lesser' POIs were discovered by explorers that travelled the Galaxy during an era that may have predated all the mod-cons we have today (like massively increased jump ranges, star filters, 20K route plotters etc) and the 'work' they put in to travelling to and locating those once interesting systems and in helping to flesh out the maps in the early days will not be forgotten.
Some of these young whipersnappers have already forgotten though ;)

It would definitely be a shame to see them go, but at the same time all things change and move on. The GMP, like the game, has evolved and grown.


"Legacy PoIs" ?
I like this.
 
I don't really see a reason to remove or reclassify older POIs. I think people just need firmer/clearer guidelines on what is now acceptable to post as a POI. The game has changed over the years, and so should the rules.
 
I like the idea of "legacy POI's." It leaves them visible for those who want to find them, but at the same time indicates to newer players that those types of systems or features are not at the level of inclusion in the current POI framework. It still honors those who made the original find, as well.
 
Name: Lovers Dance of Life
Galaxy Map Search Ref:Prooe Pruae XJ-A E0 ABC 4 B and Prooe Pruae XJ-A E0 ABC 4 C
Description:Two small moons in an extremely tight orbit around a brown dwarf with a ring system. These planets are within a fraction of a light second and can be seen to actually move albeit slowly. Both planets have Biological sites facing each other. The other planet is rather large in the sky giving a cool sense of closeness. Image of their seriously close proximity is attached they are within each others orbit + radius. The barycentric orbital point lies clearly outside the main moon and they are locked in a tight embrace twirling through the cosmos
Images of the orbits
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Image of Bio Site 5
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